Idaho police may be probing whether the killer hid in the woods before the college coed massacre

Idaho investigators may be probing whether the killer hid in the woods before entering the victims’ off-campus home and slaughtering them with a knife, Fox News Digital has learned.

Police said they have not identified any suspects or determined whether there was more than one assailant in the grisly Nov. 13 attack on Kaylee Goncalves, Madison Mogen, Ethan Chapin, and Xana Kernodle.

On Monday, a cluster of FBI agents and Idaho State Police officers were seen behind the three-story home on King Road trying to peer through the third-floor windows of Mogen’s room, which showcased a pair of pink cowboy boots.

Police have said that the victims were murdered on the second and third floors.

UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO MURDERS TIMELINE: WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT THE SLAUGHTER OF FOUR STUDENTS

Ethan Chapin, Kayle Goncalves, Maddison Mogen and Xana Kernodle, who were stabbed to death Nov.  13.

Ethan Chapin, Kayle Goncalves, Maddison Mogen and Xana Kernodle, who were stabbed to death Nov. 13.
(Fox News)

“They can look from the bushes and see a lot when the house is illuminated at night. That’s troubling,” said professor Joseph Morgan, distinguished scholar of applied forensics at Jacksonville State University. Morgan is not involved in the case but is following it closely.

King Road passes in front of the house then curves right up a steep hill and ends in a parking lot behind the house. The parking lot belongs to an apartment located to the left of the house.

Madison Mogen had a pair of pink cowgirl boots that are still displayed in the window of her rental home near the University of Idaho campus.

Madison Mogen had a pair of pink cowgirl boots that are still displayed in the window of her rental home near the University of Idaho campus.
(Derek Shook for Fox News Digital/ Instagram)

Law-enforcement officers were seen crouching behind the trees that separated the parking lot from the house, looking for the best vantage point. They were about 10 yards from the home.

Investigators were also seen looking for any depressions in the ground perhaps left by the suspect lying in wait.

Investigator at a wooded area near the home where four University of Idaho students were found fatally stabbed.

Investigator at a wooded area near the home where four University of Idaho students were found fatally stabbed.
(Derek Shook for Fox News Digital)

A law enforcement source told Fox News that authorities are investigating the possibility of a peeping Tom. Idaho State Police Communications Director Aaron Snell would only say that investigators are exploring all theories.

IDAHO UNIVERSITY MURDERERS: POLICE REVEAL KEY DETAILS ABOUT EVENTS SURROUNDING STABBING OF 4 STUDENTS

Earlier Monday, the police temporarily expanded the crime scene to include the wooded area and the parking lot behind the house.

The home where four University of Idaho students were murdered Nov.  13. The victims were found on the second and third floors.

The home where four University of Idaho students were murdered Nov. 13. The victims were found on the second and third floors.
(Derek Shook for Fox News Digital)

Investigators appeared to be exploring the killer’s possible exit route.

A group of law-enforcement agents stood in the parking lot as an Idaho State Police officer sprinted towards them from the home’s back sliding doors using two different routes.

Investigators stand in the parking lot behind the home where four University of Idaho students were brutally murdered and point towards the third-floor window.

Investigators stand in the parking lot behind the home where four University of Idaho students were brutally murdered and point towards the third-floor window.
(Derek Shook for Fox News Digital)

Mogen, Kernodle and Goncalves lived in the six-bedroom home – along with two other roommates who were there during the attack but were unharmed.

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Police have cleared them as suspects. Chapin, who was dating Kernoodle, was staying the night.

Audrey Conklin, Stephanie Pagones and Cristina Corbin contributed to this report.